2013 Youth Media Awards

This may seem like a departure from the “technology” skew of this blog, but keep in mind: books are a form of technology, too!

Today was a big day in the world of librarians: the Youth Media Awards! This is the day that the winners of the Caldecott and Newbery Awards are announced.

This year’s Caldecott winner:

This Is Not My Hat by Jon Klassen

Showcasing Klassen’s dark humor, This Is Not My Hat follows a little fish who thinks he’s gotten away with the perfect crime… but the incredible illustrations tell the reader that this is not the case. Check out the book trailer:

The Newbery winner this year is:

The One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate

This beautiful and moving book is the story of Ivan, a silverback gorilla who is the resident attraction at a rundown mall. Author Gary D. Schmidt put it best when he said: “The One and Only Ivan will break your heart– and then, against all odds, mend it again.” Here’s the book trailer:

Congrats to both winners– I am such a fan of these wonderful books!

For a complete list of Youth Media Award winners, including Newbery and Caldecott Honor books, as well as Coretta Scott King, Siebert, and Geisel Awards, go here.

And, just for fun: my very own Caldecott (AKA Callie) and (Ninian) Newbery:

Callie and Ninian

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Everything You Will Ever Need for Martin Luther King Day

Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial. Image via Wikipedia

I’ve found the motherlode. A website so comprehensive, I didn’t think such a thing could ever exist. Cybraryman has put together an exhaustive collection of MLK resources, from lesson plans, to exploration sites, to articles, and even puzzles. Check it out here!

Fun fact: Often, we assume sites with the “.org” domain are reputable. Sometimes, people use this to their advantage. One example of this is martinlutherking.org (I won’t link to it here). It’s a site I use in my lessons on evaluating websites for bias; it’s a propaganda site by a white supremacist group! 

How to Use the Library of Congress

The Library of Congress has an overwhelming amount of information, much of which is available online. With just a bit of effort, you can access and use this information with your classes. Jeff Dunn at the blog Edudemic has discovered a fantastic infographic to help us all understand the wealth of relevant, curriculum-aligned content available at our fingertips from the LOC. (Click on image to view larger.)

Teaching with the Library of Congress